Watch Repairers
SOC: 49-9064.00

Description:

Repair, clean, and adjust mechanisms of timing instruments, such as watches and clocks. Includes watchmakers, watch technicians, and mechanical timepiece repairers.


National Salary Information:

Hourly Statistics:

Annual Statistics:

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2015 wage data.


Employment Projections:

Employment (2014):
2,700 employed

Projected (2024):
2,000 employed

Projected growth (2014-2024)


Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2015 2014-2024 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2014-2024). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.


Alternate Titles:

  • Antique Clock Repairer
  • Antique Clocks Repairer
  • Auto Clocks Repairer
  • Blocker and Polisher
  • Caser
  • Chronometer Repairer
  • Clock Maker
  • Clock Mechanic
  • Clock Repair Technician
  • Clock Repairer
  • Clock Smith
  • Clockmaker
  • Clockmaker Apprentice
  • Clocksmith
  • Crowner
  • Dial Printer
  • Electric Clock Mechanic
  • Horologist
  • Horologist Apprentice
  • Pallet Repairer
  • Pallet Stone Inserter
  • Pallet Stone Positioner
  • Repair Technician
  • Screwhead Polisher
  • Time Clock Inspector
  • Time Clock Mechanic
  • Time Piece Repairer
  • Watch and Clock Repairer
  • Watch Caser
  • Watch Mechanic
  • Watch Repair Person
  • Watch Repairer Apprentice
  • Watchmaker
  • Watchmaker Apprentice


  • Job Zone Three: Medium Preparation Needed

    Experience:

    Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

    Education:

    Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

    Job Training:

    Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.


    Required Skills:

  • Reading Comprehension
  • Active Listening
  • Writing
  • Speaking
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Critical Thinking
  • Active Learning
  • Learning Strategies
  • Monitoring
  • Social Perceptiveness
  • Coordination
  • Persuasion
  • Negotiation
  • Instructing
  • Service Orientation
  • Complex Problem Solving
  • Operations Analysis
  • Technology Design
  • Equipment Selection
  • Installation
  • Operation Monitoring
  • Operation and Control
  • Equipment Maintenance
  • Troubleshooting
  • Repairing
  • Quality Control Analysis
  • Judgment and Decision Making
  • Systems Analysis
  • Systems Evaluation
  • Time Management
  • Management of Financial Resources
  • Management of Material Resources
  • Management of Personnel Resources

  • Knowledge Used:

  • Administration and Management
  • Clerical
  • Economics and Accounting
  • Sales and Marketing
  • Customer and Personal Service
  • Personnel and Human Resources
  • Production and Processing
  • Computers and Electronics
  • Engineering and Technology
  • Design
  • Building and Construction
  • Mechanical
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Chemistry
  • Psychology
  • Education and Training
  • English Language
  • Law and Government
  • Communications and Media
  • Transportation


  • Tasks:

  • Oil moving parts of timepieces.
  • Repair or replace broken, damaged, or worn parts on timepieces, using lathes, drill presses, and hand tools.
  • Clean, rinse, and dry timepiece parts, using solutions and ultrasonic or mechanical watch-cleaning machines.
  • Disassemble timepieces and inspect them for defective, worn, misaligned, or rusty parts, using loupes.
  • Reassemble timepieces, replacing glass faces and batteries, before returning them to customers.
  • Test timepiece accuracy and performance, using meters and other electronic instruments.
  • Fabricate parts for watches and clocks, using small lathes and other machines.
  • Estimate repair costs and timepiece values.
  • Perform regular adjustment and maintenance on timepieces, watch cases, and watch bands.
  • Adjust timing regulators, using truing calipers, watch-rate recorders, and tweezers.
  • Record quantities and types of timepieces repaired, serial and model numbers of items, work performed, and charges for repairs.
  • Gather information from customers about a timepiece's problems and its service history.
  • Test and replace batteries and other electronic components.
  • Demagnetize mechanisms, using demagnetizing machines.

  • Tools & Technology:

  • Arbor straighteners
  • Audio probes
  • Beat amplifiers
  • Beat setters
  • Bench knives
  • Bench polishers
  • Brushing tools
  • Busch burs
  • Case knives
  • Case openers
  • Clock timers
  • Degree gauges
  • Demagnetizing machines
  • Escape wheel straighteners
  • Fan gauges
  • Gear pullers
  • Gemological microscopes
  • Glass cutting tools
  • Hammer adjusting tools
  • Hand nut tools
  • Hand pressers
  • Ionic cleaners
  • Jewelers' hammers
  • Jewelers' loupes
  • Jewelry mallets
  • Jewelry steam cleaners
  • Lantern pullers
  • Link pin removers
  • Magnifying table lamps
  • Mainspring winders
  • Micro calipers
  • Mini pliers
  • Oil dispensing cans
  • Pin pushers
  • Pinion pullers
  • Plate spreaders
  • Screw removers
  • Small diameter needle files
  • Steam cleaner tweezers
  • Third hands
  • Tweezers
  • Utility knives
  • Watch battery testers
  • Watch hand removers
  • Watch repair screwdrivers
  • Work vises
  • GrenSoft WorkTracer
  • Intuit QuickBooks
  • Sage Software Sage50
  • Upland Consulting Group Repair Traq
  • WatchWare Repair Shop


  • installation maintenance and repair


    industry stats

    SOC: 49-0000

    Total Employed: 5,374,150

    Average Annual Salary: $45,990